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Old markets in Nakhon Pathom

Thailand Miscellaneous

25 September 2014

This October we explore some of the old markets in Nakhon Pathom where trading communities have lived for generations. Nakhon Pathom is well-known for her floating markets, but these are recent developments.

The old markets are communities on the Tha Chin River that have been living and trading there for more than a century. Here are some of the attractions you can expect to see.


Traditional coffee shop in Bang Luang Market

Besides these shops, there are lots of fresh fruits and a wide variety of snacks on sale as well.


Antiques shop in Tha Na Market

Take a tour of these old markets with us. Just click on this link Old markets in Nakhon Pathom.

Next month we visit the Nang Yai Museum in Wat Khanom, Ratchaburi.

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Old markets in Nakhon Pathom

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Princess Suvarnabhumi Residence 549/18 Onnut-Lat Krabang Road, Thapyao 02 172 9919 Excellent Bangkok Airport Hotel – professional friendly staff, one of the closest and most popular hotels in the immediate BKK Suvarnabhumi airport location.

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Izakaya lunch set menu offered at Ku De Ta

The scrumptious Japanese bento box and Ramen noodle lunches at Izakaya are on offer witha complimentary non-alcoholic drink. Kihon bento is available at B350, Tokusen bento at B500and Zeitaku bento for B750. The tempting lunch sets are available from 11am – 5pm until the end of October. Prices are subjected to a 10% service charge and prevailing government tax.

Ku Dé Ta
39-40F Sathorn Square Complex, 98 North Sathorn Rd
02-108-2000 | kudeta.com

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Sole Mio

Bangkok is packed with Italian restaurants, but most of the authentic places with comprehensive menus tend to be a bit formal and stiff. Sole Mio is a refreshing exception. Laid back and casual, it is a warm and friendly place where people always seem to be enjoying themselves and authenticity is verified by the music of the Italian language wafting through the air.

The front of the restaurant is devoted to a terrace with around 25 seats, but most customers opt for one of the 35 or so settings in the warm orange and brown interior with a bare wood floor and walls covered with a collection of photos and memorabilia.

The restaurant not only has a large selection of excellent pizzas and pastas, its pastas are some of the best in town. Although fettuccine bolognese (B240) can be an ordinary dish, Chef Luca Giorgi, who is from Bologna, turns it into a masterpiece. The dishes here are made with both imported pasta from Italy and pastas made at the restaurant. One of the latter can almost always be found on the ‘specials’ blackboard menu that changes every few days.

Although proprietor Domenico Locantore serves a wide selection traditional thin-crusted pizzas, we really enjoyed a pizza with goat cheese and salmon (B450) during a recent visit. Definitely not traditional, but the salmon and goat cheese have a remarkable affinity for one another. Of the traditional pizzas, the diavola (B260), made with tomato sauce, mozzarella, spicy salami and black olives, is delicious.

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All is definitely not pizza and pasta at Sole Mio; and the remainder of the menu is filled with classic dishes and numerous items that catch Chef Luca’s fancy. A good example is the scaloppine made with pork meat slices braised with Marsala wine (B280). It is beautifully tender but also rich and moreish thanks to the wine reduction. Sole Mio also does an especially good job with seafood. A stand out on the menu is branzino al forno – baked sea bass with baked potatoes (B450).

For dessert Chef Luca’s panna cotta (B140) topped with an orange balsamic glaze has a wow factor; the citrus of the glaze cutting through the panna cotta. It is unique and so good you’ll want to try it again. The drinks menu includes cocktails; aperitifs; a typical selection of local beers plus some imports from Italy and a reasonably priced selection of wines dominated by Italian labels. Good house wines are available by the glass or carafe (B360 for ½ litre).

Sole Mio
Thong Lor Soi 21 | 0 2185 2199
solemiobkk.com | 11.30am-11.30pm

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The Poetry of Painting

The Peach Blossom Valley, the debut Bangkok exhibition by Taiwanese artist Skyler Chen, explores human reactions to social rules and prohibitions, as he explains in an interview with Pawika Jansamakao.

The Peach Blossom Valley runs at Serindia Gallery until the end of this month. It features the work of painter Skyler Chen, who was born in 1982 and grew up in the southern Taiwanese city of Kaohsiung. After graduating from art school, he moved to the United States and opened his own studio in Long Island City. His Republic of Norman series caught international attention and was exhibited in New York, Taiwan, Singapore, Shanghai, Amsterdam, and Rotterdam. A continuation of this earlier collection, the Peach Blossom Valley paintings mark his first solo showing in Thailand.

What inspires you?
In general I find inspiration from reading books, history, exploring subcultures, certain magazines, and key global events. For this exhibition, though, I got my inspiration from reading two books in particular: The Signature of All Things by Elizabeth Gilbert and The Valley of Amazement by Amy Tan. These are two very different books, but the one thing that unites them are themes of discovery and self-discovery. I was profoundly intrigued by the idea that discovery is part of human nature. Understanding this led me to an old Chinese poem called The Peach Blossom Valley, which is the ultimate idea of discovery in Chinese culture. Visually, I was inspired by unique poses in fashion magazines that accentuate the malleability of the human form, and by traditional Chinese buildings, particularly the Chinese Art- Deco architecture found in Shanghai. These buildings and their relationship with traditional clothing created a sense of space that made its way into my work.

Your latest work is based on the writings of a 5th century Chinese poet – how are the pieces made relevant for a modern audience? What do you expect the audience take away from your Bangkok exhibition?
From my point of view, history and old fairy tales can still have a huge impact on modern society. The Peach Blossom Valley was written during a time of political instability and the poet, Tao Yuanming, created this story as a means of escape. There is a common Chinese expression, shiwai taoyuan, or ‘the peach valley beyond this world’, which more or less can be interpreted as finding an unexpected place of fantasy. Such a place is still needed by people. Through my work, I would like to open a dialogue about how such subconscious idealism and fantasy can impact our thoughts and decisions.

Noble Maidens-2-Panels  

Explain your notion of ‘a modern Chinese utopia’.
Modern Chinese people no longer run to the Peach Blossom Valley to escape, but Confucianism still has a strong influence over much of Asian culture, regulating family, education, work and government. In a Confucian world everyone knows their place and the role he or she must play to keep society harmonious. Creative thinking, innovation, self-expression and confrontation are not admirable values in such a place. As such, this societal repression of the individual creates an even bigger need for escape. These days, people seem to escape to movie theatres to watch Hollywood blockbusters, or even to luxury stores where they can marvel at a world of fantasy that they can’t really afford. By entering a dialogue about this need for escape I hope to create a space where people find the freedom to express themselves and shake off societal repression.

How has your style progressed since your Republic of Norman series?
Peach Blossom Valley paintings are still a part of Republic of Norman series, which I started eight years ago. The main goal was to create a milieu in which to discuss the human experience. With every exhibition, I pick a subject that I am passionate about as a starting point. Letting that inspiration germinate naturally into each installment of the series somehow allowed the Republic of Norman series to almost grow by itself. I enjoy translating my thoughts into a painting, which is my only outlet for expressing them. These ideas get expressed subtlety, from the smallest thoughts that get transferred into certain brush strokes to the colours I use on the canvas. I have always been very interested in painting human figures, and over the years I have been exploring the interplay of precision and fantasy. It’s not the easiest thing to do, but I hope that over time and with experience my work will grow with me.

The Peach Blooson Valley
Until September 30

Serindia Gallery
O.P. Garden, Unit 3101, 4-6 Soi 36 Charoen Krung Rd
0 2238 6410 | serindiagallery.com | Tue-Sun 11am-8pm

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Awesome Dishes at Pat Radna Moo Noom (พัฒน์ ราดหน้าหมูนุ่ม) in Bang Kapi

Glorious Bangkok Food & deals

If you’re looking for no-frills Thai Chinese stir fry dishes, and if you happen to be in Bang Kapi, Pat Radna Moo Noom (พัฒน์ ราดหน้าหมูนุ่ม) is a restaurant worth checking out. The tables are wrapped in mellow green snakeskin suede tablecloths, and the restaurant is housed in a tent sheltered by big green trees. When you approach, […]

The post Awesome Dishes at Pat Radna Moo Noom (พัฒน์ ราดหน้าหมูนุ่ม) in Bang Kapi appeared first on Thai Street Food, Restaurants, and Recipes | Eating Thai Food.

Awesome Dishes at Pat Radna Moo Noom (พัฒน์ ราดหน้าหมูนุ่ม) in Bang Kapi

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Hold the Press

With government and constitutions alternating with regularity, Thailand’s press tradition has been anything but traditional.

To start with, the kingdom’s first Thai-language newspaper was written and published not by a Thai citizen, but by American Dan Beach Bradley, a Christian missionary who spent 35 years in Siam. The two-column Bangkok Recorder, which also appeared in an English edition, was published monthly, and later biweekly, from 1841 to 1845 and 1865 to 1867.

Although Siam was an absolute monarchy at the time, there were apparently no organic laws controlling the budding newspaperman.

It wasn’t until nearly 80 years later that a second newspaper appeared in Bangkok, again at the hands of an American, Alexander MacDonald. The first issue of the Bangkok Post hit the streets on 1 August 1946 as a daily English-language broadsheet numbering four pages and costing one baht. Now in its 68th year, the Post is Thailand’s oldest existing newspaper in any language.

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A solely Thai-language newspaper, Thai Rath, was founded in 1950 but didn’t begin publishing until 1962. The following year the Press Association of Thailand began operations, and as Matichon, Siam Rath and other competing Thai newspapers came along, its member roster swelled.

I’d always wondered about the Thai Press Museum, at the Press Association of Thailand’s Dusit headquarters, and I finally paid a visit a few weeks ago.

Both museum and press association are housed in the Chatri Soponpanich Building, which is directly opposite the main gates of Rajabhat University Suan Dusit. In addition to displaying historical exhibits and artefacts, the museum also maintains an archive of research papers and other documents pertaining to the Thai press and related careers.

Although I arrived during posted opening hours, the museum door was locked shut. I had to go downstairs to the Press Association office to ask staff to unlock the door and let me in, a testament to how few visitors the museum sees.

An alcove off the foyer contains a collection of historical photos, documents and royal biographies extolling the contributions to the field of Thai journalism from each Thai king since Rama IV, with the most space given to King Bhumibol, who as an avid documentary photographer in his younger days, was once a considerable inspiration for aspiring photojournalists in Thailand.

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Further on in the main museum hall, a reproduction of an early Thai editorial office features life-size wax figures of editors, reporters and typesetters standing and sitting at various antiquated machines, engaged in the predigital production process.

Framed and hung in a prominent spot on the opposite wall is an 1893 copy of L’Illustration, a French newspaper which purportedly served as an early inspiration for Thai journalism after it reported on King Chulalongkorn’s official visit to Europe.

In the centre of the room are several glass cases containing copies of 19th- and 20th-century Thai newspapers, including original copies of the Bangkok Recorder and Siam Rath. A vintage all-black, all-metal manual Thai typewriter stands on a low table, and in a nearby corner is a manual typesetting machine of similar age.

Walls at the back of the exhibition hall support large posters detailing, in Thai (all museum labels are in Thai), the seminal achievements of Thailand’s pioneer newspaper personalities, including Dr Bradley, Tor Wor Sor, Wannako, Kulaab Saipradit, Prince Pruttiyalarbpruttiyakorn, Prince Narathippongprapan and M R Kukrit Pramoj.

No displays refer to the heavy censorship Thai journalism suffered during Thailand’s military dictatorships of the 1950s and 1960s. After the success of the democratic movement of October 1973, the new Sanya Dharmasakti government brought in a new constitution guaranteeing press freedom and abolishing censorship. Hundreds of home-grown newspapers flourished practically overnight, yet none are seen here.

In 1975 Dharmasakti was succeeded by Kukrit Pramoj, one of Thailand’s foremost intellectuals and founder of the Thai-language newspaper Siam Rath, renowned for its strong opinions. As prime minister, Kukrit introduced the kingdom’s first press controls, establishing a 17- to 21-member committee to oversee the media based on ethical considerations. Thailand’s libel and defamation laws today are heir to this experiment.

Also missing from the museum’s displays is any mention of the bloody 1976 military coup, after which strict censorship of the media became the norm for 21 years. It wasn’t until 1997 that a new Thai constitution guaranteed freedom of the press. Thai press freedom, however, suffered another serious blow during the administration of Lt Pol Col Thaksin Shinawatra when he made a habit of suing journalists who were critical of the government. Subsequent military coups and intermittent democratic regimes since 2006 have done little to support a free press in Thailand.

In a rotunda-like wing attached to the Press Association and museum is a wonderful old restaurant called Rom Sai, which serves classic Thai, Chinese and Isan cuisine. It doubles as a karaoke bar, and even in the mid afternoon you will find it full of Thai journalists and their friends sharing a bottle and singing a few tunes.

Press Association of Thailand Museum
Rajsrima Road, Dusit, Bangkok 10300 | 0 2243 5876
thaipressasso.org/museum.php | Mon-Fri, 10am-3pm
Admission free

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The Speakeasy

Bangkok is renowned for its rooftop bars but the truth is that while many of them have spectacular views, they can be slightly ‘cookie-cutter’ when it comes to their aesthetics. The Speakeasy, Hotel Muse’s in-house watering hole, at least does a good job of distinguishing itself through its old-school touches and Prohibition Era style. That’s not to say it comes up short when it comes to sweeping views – on the contrary, the lower-level bar and dining area overlook Langsuan and, one floor up, the open-air roof garden offers 360-degree views of the city skyline. There’s also a gorgeously plush interior, decked out in dark wood and leather.

As befits a place that takes its name from an under-the radar drinking den, The Speakeasy has a richly stocked bar. There’s a serious selection of wines, particularly the sparkling variety, as well as boutique spirits.

The cocktails are a slightly mixed bag; some of the concoctions billed as ‘signature’ are oddly generic. Cocktail culture in Bangkok has come a long way very quickly but this is one slightly annoying trend that has come into vogue – barring some snazzy new interpretation, there’s nothing ‘signature’ about a Mojito or a Margarita. These drinks are staples of every hotel bar in the world. A place as stylishly ambitious as The Speakeasy could surely afford to try a little harder here, especially when they’re charging B330.

Equally, the martinis veer a little too far toward sugary and brightly coloured – it’s fine if that’s what you like but it feels a little misjudged when the rest of the place cultivates such a romantic sense of nostalgia for the 1920s. In a place like The Speakeasy, the emphasis should be on vintage drinks made with real panache.

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As it turns out, the brief listing of Forgotten Classics is far more successful. There’s a cracking Negroni and a properly made White Lady – when you can deliver that, do you really need to serve up a ubiquitous B52? If that sounds like an old-fashioned gripe with certain elements of the cocktail list, the food is far more conceptually impressive – Bangkok’s other bar-focused outlets offering light bites should take note. There are some updated classics presented with real confidence, as well as the odd splicing of east and west that never feels ill-conceived or showy.

For example, the pork fillet served with a drizzle of orange emulsion and dried egg (B300) is original enough to raise an eyebrow but also immediately delicious. Then there’s the goong pun bacon (B520), a Tiger prawn wrapped in bacon served with tamarind sauce. It has all the potential to be a fusion nightmare but instead works spectacularly.

That modern Asian twist is executed with equal success in the salmon yum mamuang (B300), which pairs seared salmon with fresh green mango. The combinations are at once striking and wonderfully natural.

At its best, The Speakeasy is superbly stylish – fingers crossed they remain bold enough to blaze their own trail without too many concessions to the mass market.

The Speakeasy
24-25/F, Hotel Muse Bangkok Langsuan, 55/555 Lang Suan
0 2630 4000 | hotelmusebangkok.com | 6pm-1am

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Il Bolognese

The backstreets of Sathorn are a hotbed of wellkept dining secrets and although Il Bolognese is too well known, too much of a local favourite to fit into that category, it still warrants closer inspection. It is essentially a classy neighbourhood Italian, casual enough for a quiet lunch but with enough tricks for special occasions.

A covered patio allows for outdoor dining, but it’s the low-lit interior that is most inviting; a classic trattoria layout, rustically furnished with dark wood with a charcuterie and wood-fired pizza oven in one corner.

The approach to food is straightforward: top-quality produce, the majority of it imported, expertly prepared with an emphasis on bold flavours. For example, the polpettine (B290) are miniature beef meatballs baked with spinach and Parmesan, topped with a lip-smacking tomato sauce. These are quintessentially Italian flavours – the skill is in allowing them to speak for themselves rather than losing them in a maze of complexity.

Similarly, the caprese burrata (B420) presents burrata cheese on a bed of roasted tomato, olives and pesto. As an entree, it is a perfect complement to the richness and sauciness of the polpettine, the velvety texture of the burrata shot through with a zingy aftertaste.

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The main dishes hold this traditional line but with some signature elements. The risotto alla Milanese (B550) takes a saffron risotto and elevates it with a homemade bone marrow sauce that adds a rich meatiness. Equally, the tortelloni zucca e parma (B490) showcases delicious homemade pasta filled with roast pumpkin and ricotta cheese offset with rashers of Parma ham.

The debate on where to find the ‘best pizza in Bangkok’ is unlikely to be resolved any time soon but Il Bolognese makes a powerful case. Connoisseurs will appreciate the artisanal dough, slow-matured for 72 hours. The result is a crust that is “thick on the edges but thin inside”.

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The Ndula (B48) takes its name from the spicy sausage imported from southern Italy, and is also topped with tomato sauce, buffalo mozzarella, red onion, semidried tomato and oregano. The Diabla (B480) adds a generous dose of chilli and spicy salami to for extra bite. It’s a uniquely moreish pizza – cheesy without being overwhelming, satisfying without being too heavy.

Bangkok may be a long way from Bologna but, thanks to this little gem, geography is no reason to forego delicious Italian food.

Il Bolognese
South Sathon Rd 139/3 Soi 7 | 0 2286 8805
ilbolognesebangkok.com | 11.30am-2.30pm, 5.30pm-11pm

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Quiksilver Thailand Surf Competition

It’s the event of the season for surfers and beach bums. The Quiksilver Thailand Surf Competition, held at Patong Beach Phuket, is the place to be for some thrills, relaxation, and overall entertainment. With crystal clear waters at the perfect temperature of 28°C, the Andaman Sea is perfect for surf competitions as well as learning how to surf. Apart from the main event, there will be tons of other activities including a surf clinic for newbies, beach parties, live music, and demonstrations of other sports.

Throughout September

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newguides

BIG NEWS: Announcing the Start of a Budget Travel Guide Series

Bangkok Travel deals

Today, I’m incredibly excited to share some big, big news about a project I’ve been working on for the last few months.

Today marks the official launch of “Nomadic Matt’s Guidebooks” – a series of budget travel guides for destinations around the world.

There are a lot of guidebooks out in the world, and each has their own personality. What makes my guides different from Lonely Planet, Frommer’s, Rough Guides, or anyone else? Mine remove the fluff, get right to the point, will be updated more frequently, and are curated to focus specifically on budget travel and off the beaten path activities.

My guides are simple and easy to use. They contain the essential information you need to get around your destination without spending a lot of money. Every guide will feature the following sections:

  • Suggested budgets
  • In-depth ways to save money
  • Suggested itineraries
  • Things to do and see (with a focus on budget and off-beat attractions)
  • Places to eat
  • Places to sleep
  • Nightlife
  • Practicalities (business hours, transportation, emergency information, and visa guidelines, best times to go, etc.)

This may look like a list of the essential elements all guidebooks offer, but what makes my guides different is that they are written with the nomad in mind. My guides are for those of you who want to break the mold, get off the well-trodden tourist path and experience travel more organically. I’ve included ideas for activities that you might not see in any other publications. These guides are for the people who want adventure on a budget. If you are looking for information on those big hop-on, hop-off again buses, these guides are not for you!

I wanted to create guides that you’ll use from cover to cover, so I’ve tried to keep them brief while still including as much information as possible. Instead of just creating lists of things to do and see, I‘ve also included information on how to see a city – itineraries that maximize time, money-saving tips, and other practical advice so you get the most out of your visit. My guides take what you love about this site and supercharges it. Plus, they include my favorite hostels, restaurants, and bars – spots you probably won’t find elsewhere!

Each guide is only $4.99 (cheaper than any other guide) and is available via Amazon Kindle or PDF. Each is between 70-100 pages in length – you’ll be able to fit several on your tablet, e-reader or smartphone. Right now, they are only digital, but I’m working towards a print on demand service so you can obtain a hard copy, too. (That just takes a little longer to set up!)

I’m starting with the following five destinations:

I’ve picked locations I know well. I’ve either lived in or heavily visited each of these cities (that is how I am choosing all my initial guides). The next round of guides that will coming out around November are Thailand, Australia, Hong Kong, Berlin, and Costa Rica.

I anticipate writing a handful of guides per year and I have plans to bring on some additional writers to publish guides for destinations they know and love. We’re going to be working hard to make it easier and cheaper for you to explore the world.

How you can help

This is a big day and I humbly ask your help, especially with Amazon. Please consider purchasing one (or more!) of these new guides, either for your own future travels or as a gift for a friend. At such a low price, it’s an easy way to take the first steps towards the trip you’ve been dreaming of, or to encourage another to head out on their own adventure. More importantly, please, please leave a review of the guides once you’ve read and used them. Amazon reviews are incredibly vital to getting the books ranked well on the service.

Projects like this help keep this website running. Over the years I’ve provided a ton of free information on this site, information I’m happy to share, but your support of projects like this will help keep that information coming and support the new weekly columnists, the forum, the giveaways we host, and expanding the site so we can promote budget travel and take our message across the world. So even if you aren’t going to the destination soon, consider helping jump start the launch of this project!

It’s a new chapter for this website and I thank you for any and all of your support!

P.S. – If you know someone going to one of these five cities, please share this post with them! Or get them the book as a gift. They will love it! It will be the best $4.99 you spend!

The post BIG NEWS: Announcing the Start of a Budget Travel Guide Series appeared first on Nomadic Matt’s Travel Site.

 

BIG NEWS: Announcing the Start of a Budget Travel Guide Series

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Princess Suvarnabhumi Residence 549/18 Onnut-Lat Krabang Road, Thapyao 02 172 9919 Excellent Bangkok Airport Hotel – professional friendly staff, one of the closest and most popular hotels in the immediate BKK Suvarnabhumi airport location.

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