Archive for Bangkok Airport Hotels

EL-i24-jpeg82

We can weave anything – but who will buy it?

EL i24 jpeg82 EL i24 jpeg83

We can weave anything – but who will buy it?Expats write about their life-style and interesting events in Thailand

Princess Suvarnabhumi Residence 549/18 Onnut-Lat Krabang Road, Thapyao 02 172 9919 Excellent Bangkok Airport Hotel – professional friendly staff, one of the closest and most popular hotels in the immediate BKK Suvarnabhumi airport location.

Bangkok Airport Hotel

GD Star Rating
loading...
GD Star Rating
loading...
i25-FebMar126

Man’s best friend

i25 FebMar126 i25 FebMar127

Man’s best friendExpats write about their life-style and interesting events in Thailand

Princess Suvarnabhumi Residence 549/18 Onnut-Lat Krabang Road, Thapyao 02 172 9919 Excellent Bangkok Airport Hotel – professional friendly staff, one of the closest and most popular hotels in the immediate BKK Suvarnabhumi airport location.

Bangkok Airport Hotel

GD Star Rating
loading...
GD Star Rating
loading...
i25-FebMar96

Chocolate: the good, the bad, and the ugly

i25 FebMar96 i25 FebMar97

Chocolate: the good, the bad, and the uglyExpats write about their life-style and interesting events in Thailand

Princess Suvarnabhumi Residence 549/18 Onnut-Lat Krabang Road, Thapyao 02 172 9919 Excellent Bangkok Airport Hotel – professional friendly staff, one of the closest and most popular hotels in the immediate BKK Suvarnabhumi airport location.

Bangkok Airport Hotel

GD Star Rating
loading...
GD Star Rating
loading...
i25-FebMar40

Women of the World

i25 FebMar40 i25 FebMar41

Women of the WorldExpats write about their life-style and interesting events in Thailand

Princess Suvarnabhumi Residence 549/18 Onnut-Lat Krabang Road, Thapyao 02 172 9919 Excellent Bangkok Airport Hotel – professional friendly staff, one of the closest and most popular hotels in the immediate BKK Suvarnabhumi airport location.

Bangkok Airport Hotel

GD Star Rating
loading...
GD Star Rating
loading...

The On Nut Area – Bangkok

On Nut area is becoming an increasingly popular and attractive place for both Thai locals and foreigners who want to live in Bangkok. Despite a slight slowdown of the real estate market of whole Bangkok Metropolis, On Nut does not seem to lose its popularity and attractiveness. During the last several years, a huge number of foreigners are flowing into this area. And there …The On Nut Area – Bangkok
bangkok airport transfer

Bangkok Airport Hotel

GD Star Rating
loading...
GD Star Rating
loading...
thai-tourism-fair-2016-north-umbrellas

Thai Tourism Fair 2016 – beauty in diversity

Thailand Miscellaneous

29 January 2015

Welcome back to the February issue of the Bangkok Travelbug 2016. We interrupt our regular feature article to bring you this special event which is held annually in Bangkok.

The Thai Tourism Fair, besides promoting tourism, is a wonderful way to have an insight into Thai history, culture and handicraft. It’s like a peek into a window to view a vast multi-coloured cultural spectrum.




Umbrellas of Bo Sang, Chiang Mai

Nowhere else will visitors be able to view in one place the ethnic and cultural diversity of the various regions in Thailand, their customs, ceremonies, beliefs, handicraft and food.




Masks for the Ghost Festival in Loei

Join us in reviewing the Thai Tourism Fair 2016

Read what other subscribers have said about us. Join us and subscribe to the Bangkok Travelbug.

Next month we visit the Suphanburi National Museum, Suphanburi.

If you are an independent traveller, here’s a handy e-guide book, Tour Bangkok Legacies that will help you along as you explore the streets of Bangkok and discover its old treasures. It’s complete with historical descriptions, maps and detailed directions on how to get to these places.

My Kindle e-book

Thai Tourism Fair 2016 – beauty in diversity

Bangkok Airport Hotel 3 of the most popular Bangkok Airport Hotels – great deals, all hotels within 10 minutes of the airport terminal, 24 hour reception and transfer service – instant confirmation and secure payment.

GD Star Rating
loading...
GD Star Rating
loading...
isaan041

Visiting Isaan: Adventures Through Rural Thailand

Bangkok Travel deals

Golden-roofed temple in Isaan
Thailand’s Isaan region is one of the most under-visited parts of the country. The area is its most rural, and travelers simply pass through it on their way to Laos or skip it altogether in favor of places like Pai, Chiang Mai, or the islands of the south. While Thailand is thought of as this overrun, tourist-filled place, most of the country is actually devoid of them.

In my two weeks in the region, I saw six other travelers. SIX! Travelers are so rare in this part of Thailand that I was often met with quizzical looks by locals — faces that seemed to ask: “Are you lost? Chiang Mai is the other way.” (For all the talk of “getting off the beaten path,” few backpackers leave the banana pancake trail.)

After spending close to ten years traveling and living in Thailand, I had decided it was time to get off the beaten track and visit this region (it was the main reason I took the cheap flight to Thailand in November). There are only so many times one can go to Chiang Mai! I wanted to see the rural interior — Thai life away from Western influences and tourist infrastructure — and get to know Thai culture a little better.

Isaan — a land of mostly farms and villages, architecturally uninspiring cities, spicy and delicious food (some of the best in Thailand) — exceeded all of my expectations. Isaan is one of those places where you can get off the trail and see what life, unspoiled by tourists, is really like in Thailand.

While I’ll get into the logistics of traveling Isaan in another post, today I want to share my favorite sights and activities:

Korat

Isaan's gateway city, Korat
Isaan’s gateway city, Korat is the nickname given to Nakhon Ratchasima. It’s the region’s largest, most well-to-do town and features a big university. Like most Thai cities, it lacks any real inspiring architecture, but it does have a lot of beautiful temples, including Wat Ban Rai and Wat Phayap. The city is definitely worth a day or two as you make your way deeper into Isaan. When you’re there, head to the Yellow Pumpkin for a cool coffee shop, stay at Tokyo Mansion, and eat at the soup stall on the corner Buarong and Suranaree Rds. It’s open at night and incredibly popular. I stumbled on it, and it was the best noodle soup I had in Isaan.

Phimai

Ruins at Phimai in Thailand
This historic ruin is an easy day trip from Korat. It was mostly built around the 11th and 12th centuries by the Khmers when they controlled the area. Beautiful and under-visited, this site features a center temple surrounded by a few mini-strictures and square gigantic wall. To get to the temple, you walk across a naga bridge (naga serpents were guardians of heaven), through a crumbling wall, and across a field. The complex inspires awe as you approach it, and it reminded me a lot of Angkor Wat (they were built in the same style) but without the crowds. I saw only two other foreigners there, as this ruin is mostly frequented by Thais and school groups.

Nong Khai

Naga statues at Nong Khai in Isaan
Mostly a stopover city for tourists coming in and out of Laos, Nong Khai was awesome. There are amazing food and coffee shops (try Macky’s Riverside Kitchen or Cake at Toey’s), river cruises up and down the Mekong, and a cool market. Also, lots of temples: I’m a big fan of Wat Pho Chi and Wat Phra That Khlang Nam. While I really liked the slow pace of life, what really blew me away was Sala Kaew Ku. This sculpture park, built by Bunleua Sulilat in 1978, has hundreds of statues (mostly of Buddha) in all shapes and sizes. It was the coolest thing I saw in all of the city, and I especially loved the giant Buddha with the naga snakes over it (that’s a lot of concrete!).

Ubon Ratchathani

Bright Buddhist temple in Ubon Ratchathani
Another stopover city for tourists on their way to Laos. I liked the relaxed feel here. The only foreigners who stay in this city either married a Thai or teach English. There isn’t much to do here, so it’s a good place to unwind. You can overload on one of the Buddhist temples in the city (my favorites are Wat Tai Prachao Yai Ong Tue and Wat Thung Si Muang), visit the famous night market or the surprisingly detailed national museum, and eat dinner on the river, but there’s not much more to the city than that! I would also suggest a cab to the Wat Nong Pah Pong outside the city (300 baht round-trip). A tiny temple, the tree-covered grounds, and numerous paths make it an incredibly tranquil and Japan-esque place to walk around.

Prasat Ta Muan

Ancient temple in rural Thailand
In between Korat and Surin is Prasat Ta Muan, a historic site consisting of two large temples built by the Khmers in the 11th century. The first site is located on top of a hill and, well, quite underwhelming. It’s a beautiful temple, with a large prasat (temple) in the middle and Indiana Jones–style ruins surrounding it. In this main structure is where they would pray. There’s a large Buddha shrine and some cool pits and drains where they would purify themselves during rituals. The highlight, though, is really the view of the surrounding area. You get this sweeping view of the hills and farms in the area. I liked the smaller Ta Muan Toch complex better (it’s about a 20 minute ride from the big temple). There are far fewer people (I counted eight on my visit), and four beautiful ponds and a well-preserved wall surround the temple. The inner area itself is mostly a pile of ruins, however. You can visit both as a day tour from Korat or Surin, but with more time, stay in Nang Rang for a night and rent a bike to get around. If you do, stay at Honey Inn. It’s cheap and the owners are amazing (and they will drive you to the bus station in the morning).

Phu Phra Bat Historical Park

Isaan
An hour outside of Nong Khai is Phu Phra Bat, a national archeological park that features ancient stone houses and rock formations. After a beautiful scenic drive, you’ll arrive at the park (it’s going to be just you and school kids) where you can wander a forest and see some rock art. The purpose of the area is still a mystery to historians and archeologists alike, but the 3,000-year-old rock formations are thought to have been formed initially by river erosion and then later modified by religious groups.

Biking around the countryside

Isaan
The best part of Isaan is wandering the rural countryside, and that’s very hard to do if you don’t have your own transport. Isaan lacks an extensive transportation network outside the major towns. My favorite memories were the scenic bike rides through the rice fields, farms, and small towns, and down dirt roads. But I wouldn’t have had those if I had hired drivers to take me around the whole time, which was an expensive thing to do. And, I never got really far because I could only hire some for the day. When I wandered Isaan with a driver, I wished I had my own method to get around. Rent a bike or car, go at your own pace, get far off the road, and enjoy lush and vibrant green farmland, friendly and curious locals, cheap meals, and cows blocking your way!

It’s a shame not many people visit this part of Isaan and I kick myself for not visiting sooner. This area may be rural and lack the activities of other regions, but Isaan is a diamond in the rough and a visit here will give you a fascinating look at small-town Thailand. It’s an area to get away from it all and enjoy the country.

P.S. – Last week, I released a new version of my blogging course with more comprehensive information, screen shots, examples, new webinars, expert interviews, video tutorials, and case studies. If you’re a blogger and interested in taking your blog to the next level, come check it out!

P.P.S – I’m getting rid of the last few “Keep Calm and Travel On” t-shirts I have. Each shirt comes with ALL six of my city guides ($42 value)! I’m moving when I get back to the states! Here’s information on how to get one!. They are comfy! Promise! :)

The post Visiting Isaan: Adventures Through Rural Thailand appeared first on Nomadic Matt’s Travel Site.


Visiting Isaan: Adventures Through Rural Thailand

If you need a bangkok airport transfer
look no further bangkokairportlimo.com offers the most reliable, competitive deals (all rates are inclusive of tolls).

Travel Better, Cheaper, Longer

Bangkok Airport Hotel 3 of the most popular Bangkok Airport Hotels – great deals, all hotels within 10 minutes of the airport terminal, 24 hour reception and transfer service – instant confirmation and secure payment.

GD Star Rating
loading...
GD Star Rating
loading...

Bangkok’s Real Estate Market

Bangkok’s Real Estate Market: The Current Situation and Prospects

Without any doubt, Bangkok has become a hot spot in the Asian real estate market long time ago. Since 2008, the real estate market of the Thailand’s capital shot up and started to grow by enormously huge rates. Besides, the growth was supported by the large demand of both nationals and foreigners and high rates of GDP growth (see the chart).

Considering the fact that the majority of the Thais either live in or look to rent a dwelling in condos, the best way to analyze the market is to take a look at the number of newly-registered condominiums. That is definitely a case, and the chart shows a clear trend: the market is on the rise (despite a noticeable showdown in 2011). Back in 2006, the Thailand’s capital could boast only 23,212 registered condominiums. Yet in 2014 (the data for 2015 are still not available), the number of newly-registered condos amounted to 108,175, which required the growth of at least 15% per year.

The number of registered condominiums is soaring up, while the GDP growth becomes more and more sluggish

Source: Bank of Thailand

Despite the widespread predictions about looming problems in the Bangkok’s real estate market due to political reasons – civil unrest and military overthrow – the industry seems to be doing quite well now. Several analysts expressed concerns over the real estate market and the problems that may appear due to the economy, which is starting to cool down. This point of view may be correct, as the GDP growth of the Thailand’s economy dropped from 7.3 to 0.9 percent. Yet, the economy’s troubles still have not had so noticeable impact on the market – yet have already prompted some real estate developers to abandon several large projects.

Another emerging trend is a decrease of Bangkok’s share in the Thailand’s real estate market, as developers are striving to seize the opportunity and build affordable housing elsewhere save Bangkok. Several reasons could prompt developers to put bigger emphasis on outside-of-Bangkok-housing: high prices of housing within the Thailand’s capital, growing demand in other parts of the country, and a lack of affordable, reasonably priced land for development in Bangkok.

Condominiums rise up nationwide; the share of Bangkok in the total number of registered condominiums is falling

Source: Bank of Thailand

 

Reality of the Bangkok’s Real Estate Market

In the Bangkok’s real estate market, condominiums have started to noticeably prevail over houses since 2008. It can be explained by the high price of the lands within Bangkok Metropolis, and now, it is definitely not a surprise, the majority of Bangkok residents live in condos. Besides, huge sums of property credits supported the demand for housing (see the chart). By 2014, the outstanding credit (to both developers and purchasers) reached the mark of 2,256.7 billion Baht (equal to a little bit more than $63 billion), which appears to be a historic maximum.

 

The property credit runs high, while the Bangkok’s market is getting even hungrier for real estate

Source: Bank of Thailand

However, the unconvincing performance of the national economy and external conjuncture cause reasonable concerns about the future of the Bangkok’s real estate market. A number of economists fear about a bubble that was, similar to the United States, created in the Thailand. Yet, there is a huge difference between the Bangkok housing market and a housing market of any other country: Thailand can boast a much bigger number of foreigners willing to buy and buying the property in the country in proportion to the country’s population. Therefore, the market is supported by a huge flow of cash streaming from abroad.

The House Price Index does not show signs of dropping

Source: Bank of Thailand

 

Despite the fact that the economy’s state is getting bleaker, the House Price Index, calculated by the Bank of Thailand, does not demonstrate any sign of price fall. The prices have been continuously rising even during political unrest in the country. CBRE, a consultancy, notes that even though the rise of prices has been slowed down, it does not change the overall trend for now. According to its data, the condominium units in Sukhummit, Central Lumpini and Silom/Sathorn areas were sold for 179,762, 196,250 and 190,714 Baht per square meter in the third quarter of 2015.

 

A high-class Focus Ploenchit condo that includes 132 units is striving to sell them

 

However, the consultancy points out that there was a fall in sales of condominiums in all areas of Bangkok, which may appear to be a first sign of the future real estate market’s drop. Definitely, it may be considered as a sign of the real estate market cooling down in general, but it also may be a consequence of building a lot of new condominiums and houses in other Thailand’s cities.

In addition to that, the consultancy predicts that in 2018 Bangkok will see a sharp fall in completion of condominiums in its downtown, as a larger share of condos will be built in midtown or suburbans. The case is that the market is oversupplied by luxury, high-class condos (take a loot at Focus Ploenchit, for example), and the majority of developers will focus on affordable housing.

 

What One May Expect From the Real Estate Market of Bangkok?

Despite the sluggish growth of the economy, the occupancy rate of Bangkok’s offices noticeably grew in 2015, and this caused a moderate increase of the rent price that varied from 4 up to 10 percent. However, a drop in the completion of new buildings, especially in the downtown, may prompt a further rise of rent prices for office space.

The occupancy rate of apartments, though, has seen a modest fall, especially in such districts as the Central Lumpini area that can boast the highest average rent. Yet, it did not cause neither a fall in price nor serious concerns over the market’s prospects. And even though the market’s prospects are not as bright as they were 5 years ago, there is still a room for careful optimism.

First of all, the government has supported the capital’s real estate market by launching an imposing number of infrastructure projects. Thongma Vijitpongpun, the President and CEO of Pruksa Real Estate, pointed out that the time when government starts financing serious infrastructure projects opens up new opportunities for real estate companies. In particular, it means an easier access to cheaper to land, where companies may launch new residential projects. The government has a goal of transferring Thailand in general and Bangkok in particular into a transport hub of Asia, and this brings a lot of opportunities for the real estate market. After such a message from the government, many real estate companies have become more optimistic despite several cancelled projects and predicted “at least 5-7 per cent growth during the following five years”.

Another positive moment is that one of the major real estate developers, Sansiri, doubled the number of its project up to 21 this year, and its president declared that the company has no intentions of cancelling them. The president’s optimism was caused not only by the government initiative, but also by a number of factors like the drop in oil prices and lower interest rates.

After all, an important point is the development of new projects in other areas of Bangkok and even in suburban areas. While the most of the newly-built condominiums were built in the Sukhumvit, Central Lapini and Silom/Sathorn areas, soon it is going to change. Sukhumvit, near which the OnNut area is located, will still attract a lot of developers, renters and purchasers. The OnNut area also attracts a lot of purchasers and developers and, therefore, these two areas will continue to enjoy the rise in a number of condos.

Yet, the government’s infrastructure initiatives will give a rise to the project development in the other areas. In particular, it is going about the Ratchadaphisek and Phahonyothin areas. After all, the process of the gradual transition to the suburban project developments – the process that takes places elsewhere in the world, especially in London – will take off. It is a start of the major transformations in the real estate market of Bangkok.

 

 

 

Bangkok’s Real Estate Market
bangkok airport transfer

Bangkok Airport Hotel

GD Star Rating
loading...
GD Star Rating
loading...
isaan03

Isaan: 7 Highlights from Rural Thailand

Bangkok Travel deals

Isaan
Isaan

Isaan
Isaan
Isaan
Isaan
Isaan

Isaan
Isaan
Isaan
Isaan

Isaan

Thailand’s Isaan region is one of the most under-visited parts of the country. The area is its most rural, and travelers simply pass through it on their way to Laos or skip it altogether in favor of places like Pai, Chiang Mai, or the islands of the south. While Thailand is thought of as this overrun country, tourist-filled place, most of the country is actually devoid of them.

In my two weeks in the region, I saw six other travelers. SIX! Travelers are so rare in this part of Thailand that I was often met with quizzical looks by locals — faces that seemed to ask “Are you lost? Chiang Mai is the other way.” (For all the talk of “getting off the beaten track,” few backpackers leave the banana pancake trail.)

After spending close to ten years traveling and living in Thailand, I had decided it was time to get off the beaten path and visit this region (it was the main reason I took the cheap flight to Thailand in November). There’s only so many times one can go to Chiang Mai! I wanted to see the rural interior — Thai life away from Western influences and tourist infrastructure — and get to know Thai culture a little better.

Isaan — a land of mostly farms and villages, architecturally uninspiring cities, spicy and delicious food (some of the best in Thailand) — exceeded all of my expectations. Isaan is one of those places where you can get off the trail and see what life, unspoiled by tourists, is really like in Thailand.

While I’ll get into the logistics of traveling Isaan in another post, today I want to share my favorite sights and activities:

Korat

Isaan
Isaan’s gateway city, Korat is the nickname given to Nakhon Ratchasima. It’s the region’s largest, most well-to-do town and features a big university. Like most Thai cities, it lacks any really inspiring architecture, but it does have a lot of beautiful temples, including Wat Ban Rai and Wat Phayap. The city is definitely worth a day or two as you make your way deeper into Isaan. When you’re there, head to the Yellow Pumpkin for a cool coffee shop, stay at Tokyo Mansion, and eat at the soup stall on the corner Buarong and Suranaree Rds. It’s open at night and incredibly popular. I stumbled on it, and it was the best noodle soup I had in Isaan.

Phimai

Isaan
This historic ruin is an easy day trip from Korat. It was mostly built around the 11th and 12th centuries by the Khmers when they controlled the area. Beautiful and under-visited, this site features a center temple surrounded by a few mini-strictures and square gigantic wall. To get to the temple, you walk across a naga bridge (naga serpents were guardians of heaven), through a crumbling wall, and across a field. The complex inspires awe as you approach it, and it reminded me a lot of Angkor Wat (they were built in the same style) but without the crowds. I saw only two other foreigners there, as this ruin is mostly frequented by Thais and school groups.

Nong Khai

Isaan
Mostly a stopover city for tourists coming in and out of Laos, Nong Khai was awesome. There are amazing food and coffee shops (try Macky’s Riverside Kitchen or Cake at Toey’s), river cruises up and down the Mekong, and a cool market. Also, lots of temples: I’m a big fan of Wat Pho Chi and Wat Phra That Khlang Nam. While I really liked the slow pace of life, what really blew me away was Sala Kaew Ku. This sculpture park, built by Bunleua Sulilat in 1978, has hundreds of statues (mostly of Buddha) in all shapes and sizes. It was the coolest thing I saw in all of the city, and I especially loved the giant Buddha with the naga snakes over it (that’s a lot of concrete!).

Ubon Ratchathani

Isaan
Another stopover city for tourists on their way to Laos. I liked the relaxed feel here. The only foreigners who stay in this city either married a Thai or teach English. There isn’t much to do here, so it’s a good place to unwind. You can overload on one of the Buddhist temples in the city (my favorites are Wat Tai Prachao Yai Ong Tue and Wat Thung Si Muang), visit the famous night market or the surprisingly detailed national museum, and eat dinner on the river, but there’s not much more to the city than that! I would also suggest a cab to the Wat Nong Pah Pong outside the city (300 baht round-trip). A tiny temple, the tree-covered grounds, and numerous paths make it an incredibly tranquil and Japan-esque place to walk around.

Prasat Ta Muan

In between Korat and Surin is Prasat Ta Muan, a historic consisting of two large temples built by the Khmers in the 11th century. The first site is located on top of a hill and, well, quite underwhelming. It’s a beautiful temple, with a large prasat (temple) in the middle and Indiana Jones–style ruins surrounding it. In this main structure is where they would pray. There’s a large Buddha shrine and some cool pits and drains where they would purify themselves during rituals. The highlight, though, is really the view of the surrounding area. You get this sweeping view of the hills and farms in the area. I liked the smaller Ta Muan Toch complex better (it’s about a 20 minute ride from the big temple). There are far fewer people (I counted eight on my visit), and four beautiful ponds and a well-preserved wall surround the temple. The inner area itself is mostly a pile of ruins, however. You can visit both as a day tour from Korat or Surin, but with more time, stay in Nang Rang for a night and rent a bike to get around. If you do, stay at Honey Inn. It’s cheap and the owners are amazing (and they will drive you to the bus station in the morning).

Phu Phra Bat Historical Park

An hour outside of Nong Khai is Phu Phra Bat, a national archeological park that features ancient stone houses and rock formations. After a beautiful scenic drive, you’ll arrive at the park (it’s going to be just you and school kids) where you can wander a forest and see some rock art. The purpose of the area is still a mystery to historians and archeologists alike, but the 3,000-year-old rock formations are thought to have been formed initially by river erosion and then later modified by religious groups.

Biking around the countryside

The best part of Isaan is wandering the rural countryside, and that’s very hard to do if you don’t have your own transport. Isaan lacks an extensive transportation network outside the major towns. My favorite memories were the scenic bike rides through the rice fields, farms, and small towns, and down dirt roads. But I wouldn’t have had those if I hadn’t hired drivers to take me around, which was an expensive thing to do. And, I never got really far because I could only hire some for the day. As I wandered Isaan, I wished I had my own method to get around. Rent a bike or car, go at your own pace, get far off the road, and enjoy lush and vibrant green farmland, friendly and curious locals, cheap meals, and cows blocking your way!

It’s a shame not many people visit this part of Isaan and I kick myself for not visiting sooner. This area may be rural and lack the activities of other regions, but Isaan is a diamond in the rough, and a visit here will give you a fascinating look at small-town Thailand. It’s an area to get away from it all and enjoy the country.

More resources to help you plan your trip to Thailand: 

The post Isaan: 7 Highlights from Rural Thailand appeared first on Nomadic Matt’s Travel Site.


Isaan: 7 Highlights from Rural Thailand

If you need a bangkok airport transfer
look no further bangkokairportlimo.com offers the most reliable, competitive deals (all rates are inclusive of tolls).

Travel Better, Cheaper, Longer

Bangkok Airport Hotel 3 of the most popular Bangkok Airport Hotels – great deals, all hotels within 10 minutes of the airport terminal, 24 hour reception and transfer service – instant confirmation and secure payment.

GD Star Rating
loading...
GD Star Rating
loading...
moviescreen

My (Current) Ultimate List of Travel Movies

Bangkok Travel deals

People watching movies
Way back in 2008, I created a list of ten of the best travel movies ever. It’s a great list. But 2008 was a long time ago (Have I really been blogging for eight years?! What!). Since I watch a lot of movies on flights and there have been many wonderful and breathtaking travel movies made since then, watching The Way a few days ago, made realize, that we’re long overdue for a list of my all time favorite travel movies that will inspire you to get off the couch, pack your bag, and head to unknown lands:

Lost in Translation
lost in translation with Scarlet Johansson
Besides being a all around incredible movie, this movie takes you into the heart of chaotic Tokyo. Bill Murray and Scarlet Johansson play two characters adrift in their hotel…at least, until they cut loose and explore Tokyo. These characters are suffering from a self imposed confinement and that bonds them together. Together, they escape into Tokyo, with its non-stop energy. The sights, the sounds, and energy overwhelms you and will have you booking a flight to Japan. It’s one of my favorite movies of all time.

Whale Rider
whale rider blue photo with whale
I remember seeing this movie when it came out. It blew me away. The story follows a little girl in a Maori village and her struggle to get her grandfathers acceptance. But the real star here is Maori culture. The modern world of a Maori is spotlighted in an accurate portrayal that invokes wonder and sympathy. I met a member of the featured tribe while in New Zealand who said the film benefited his people greatly. This movie sparked a fascination with Maori culture that is part of the reason why I went to New Zealand.

Lord of the Rings
lord of the rings movie
Another New Zealand based movie, Peter Jackson’s award winning epic will leave you stunned with the diverse and beautiful landscape of New Zealand. From glaciers, to rivers, to mountains and forest, New Zealand’s beauty was the star of this movie. It launched the country’s modern tourist industry and made it one of the premier destinations to travel to for adventure seekers. Die hard fans can do Lord of the Rings tours.

Into the Wild
into the wild film
Based on a true story, this movie follows Christopher McCandless as he tries to shed his material life and get in touch with life and nature. After graduating from college, Christopher sets out on a road trip through the country before ending up in Alaska. Much of the story is based on second hand accounts, yet the movie is a poignant reminder that we all could simplify our lives a little bit and just enjoy living. It reminds us that travel is not about what we carry with us but about what we carry inside.

In Bruges
two men talking in movie in bruges
Colin Farrell may have thought a life in Bruges was hell but the city provides a beautiful back drop for this comedy. And I have to admit, until I saw this movie, I really didn’t know much about Bruges. Sure, I knew where it was and that it was famous but I’d never given much though to it. After this movie, I wanted to go to Bruges. It looked beautiful. (And, upon visiting there, I can confirm it is.) Bruges is a great destination for travelers who want to step back in time. This movie will have you including it in your next European adventure.

Under the Tuscan Sun
under the tuscan sun scene
I don’t like Diane Lane romance movies and this movie is totally one of them. Girl feels lost in life, starts fresh, meets guy, everything works out. This movie could start any actress because the real movie star here is Tuscany. Tuscany provides the stunning backdrop for this otherwise mediocre movie. This places lives up to all the hype that surrounds it and will make you want to leave home and buy a vineyard in some small Italian village.

Nowhere in Africa
girl in nowhere in africa reading to african children
A German movie that follows the true life story of a Jewish family who escapes the Nazis to run a farm in Kenya. The movie deals with how they adjust to their new life, and cope with the life they left behind. Anyone who has ever lived and adapted to a new culture will be able to relate. It’s not always easy and as this movie shows, it’s possible once you open yourself up. The movie is in German but subtitled in English. Besides being a inspiring travel movie, it’s one of my favorite foreign language movies.

Crocodile Dundee
crocodile dundee main character
Not only did these movies launch the short career of Paul Hogan but they made everyone want to be an Aussie. Dundee was the MacGyver of the outback. While the movies gave a generation of people cliched notions of Australia, they also gave Americans a connection to the country. Like us, Aussies were free spirited pioneers with a love for the wilderness. While it’s cliche and exaggerated, Australians do share a love for nature and the movie inspired people to visit Oz.

Up in the Air
scene at the airport from up in the air with george clooney
I live in airport world. Maybe not as much as Ryan Bingham, George Clooney’s character, but when I saw this movie, I found myself relating too much to Ryan’s character. Though in some ways it has a happy ending, I found the movie to be a downer. I was depressed for hours afterwards. Because I see myself in Ryan’s lifestyle. He’s a man who feels at home in airports and planes and is constantly on the move. As he says, moving is living. The movie is a must watch for long term traveler as it brings up the sometimes mixed emotions we have about living in constant motion.

The Beach
Leonardo Caprio in the Thai waters in The Beach movie
Released in 2000, the movie follows Alex Garland’s novel about young backpackers who set out to find paradise but end up destroying it, and it had me drooling over Thailand. Those beaches, those parties, those people. It seemed wonderful. Backpackers in Asia are always reading the book, and the movie plays in all the guesthouses. It says something about our hopes for the road- we want to find our own idyllic, romantic paradise. The one we all think won’t be destroyed, but will. The movie has a different ending, characters, and storyline than the book, but the theme is the same. It is a great reflection on the hopes and realities of travel.

The Motorcycle Diaries
Characters fixing a bike in the travel movie: The Motorcycle Diaries
Set in South America, this movie follows the life of Che Guevara from doctor to revolutionary. Starring Gael Garcia Bernal, this poignant tale features amazing images of South America, from the deserts to the rain forest. It shows the heart breaking poverty of the time period too. Beautifully cast and directed, this movie will make you want to jump on a motorcycle and explore the continent. Even if you do not agree with the politics of the movie, its acting is first rate, and this movie transcends the politics of the man it follows. It was critically acclaimed for a reason.

Any Indiana Jones
Harrison Ford playing Indiana Jones in this classic travel film
Indy made everyone an archaeologist and an adventure seeker. From Egypt to India, Indy showed us the world and the mythology of ancient cultures. The movie brought out the adventurer in me and helped foster a love for history. It also did wonders for Petra, Jordan. Who didn’t want to see the city after watching the Last Crusade!? Despite the lackluster fourth installment, these movies not only remain some of the best of all time, but some of the best in travel.

Thelma and Louise
Thelma and Louise riding off famously in their convertible car
Released in 1991, this tragic story stars Susan Sarandon and Geena Davis as two women driving across the American Southwest in search of adventure and friendship while escaping the law. The movie is stunningly acted, winning many accolades, and also features breathtaking shots of the American west that will make you want to get in your car and see the country… unless gas prices keep rising, then we’ll just have to settle for this movie.

Lawrence of Arabia
Lawrence of Arabia riding camel back through the desert in this classic film
Released in 1962, this Peter O’Toole classic is set during World War One and follows a British soldier’s interaction with nomadic tribes. O’Toole is T.E. Lawrence who unites Arabian tribes against the Turks. With stunning images of the desert, you’ll soon be wanting to lead your own expedition through the desert, though probably not for war. Lawrence may remain a controversial figure, but there’s no controversy that this is a great film set in an amazing place.

Priscilla, Queen of the Desert
Character in drop clothes in the Australian desert in the film: Priscilla, queen of the desert
A movie about Australian drag queens that take a road trip across the desert in order to perform at a lip syncing show. It’s funny, it’s heartwarming, it won a bunch of awards. The stars get shocking reactions as they wander across the outback towards their show, stopping often along the way. Most importantly, it highlights two of the best things about Australia: the outback and awesome accents.

A Good Year
Russell Crowe riding a motorbike in the vineyard in A Good Year
Made in 2006 and starring Russell Crowe, this movie features him as an uptight banker who finds his soul again when returns to his uncle’s vineyard. All he wants to do is sell it and make some money, but soon the countryside and a pretty French girl have him changing his tune. (French girls always have you changing your tune!) It’s a movie for the wine lover, and along with Under The Tuscan Sun, will have you heading off to the nearest vineyard before the credits finish.

Eurotrip
Backpackers on a European street in the movie Eurotrip
A silly movie about backpacking in Europe, this movie will nonetheless have you wanting to see all the places they filmed. The movie takes you across Europe in a whirlwind of stereotypes, but it’s pretty funny, and anyone who has roamed Europe can probably relate to a few of the situations. The script isn’t deep, and some of the situations are goofy, but it does a good job of sending you across Europe and features a very memorable appearance by Matt Damon.

Seven Years in Tibet
Brad Pitt in a hat in Tibet staring from the 7 Years in Tibet film
This movie is about a German mountaineer Heinrich Harrer and his time with the Dalai Lama. Released in 1997 and starring Brad Pitt, it takes an interesting look at Tibetan culture on the eve of the Chinese invasion. You get an outsider’s perspective on this remote nation and of the ruler who now lives in exile in India. It is an interesting movie, even if it’s not 100% historically accurate.

The Darjeeling Limited
man running after a train in India movie called the darjeeling limited
A year after their father’s funeral, three brothers travel across India by train in an attempt to bond, grieve, and get closer. As the brothers try to find meaning in their loss, they fight, resent each other, overcome barriers, and learn to love India. While not my favorite Wes Anderson movie, I loved the cinematography and scenery of this movie. I felt it did a good job of making you want to jump on a plane to India.

Midnight in Paris
love scene from Midnight in Paris
I pretty much love every movie about Paris but this is one of my all time favorites, not least because it is set mostly set 1920s Jazz Age Paris – the one time period I would live in above all others. The movie follows Gil, a writer on vacation with his fiancee and her family. At night, he wanders the streets of Paris before stumbling into a time wrap that sends him back to the ’20s to meet some of the most famous people of the age. With its lighting, story, and incredible acting, this movie will make your heart swoon for the City of Lights. Even though it plays to all the cliches of Paris, I eat it up!

Monsoon Wedding
rainy wedding scene from the popular Indian movie monsoon wedding
This Indian independent film tells the story of a arranged marriage and the modern pushback against this tradition by the bridge as the family prepares to host a four day wedding. Artfully shot with intriguing characters and beautiful scenery, this is not only one of my favorite travel movies (and a phenomenal look at Indian culture) but one of my all time favorite movies ever. I highly recommend you watch this movie.

The Secret Life of Walter Mitty
backpacking scene from the secret life of walter mitty with ben stiller
This movie was better than I thought (and helped create a boom in Icelandic tourism). Walter Mitty, a guy who hates his job and dreams of a more exciting and adventurous life, is the liaison between Life magazine and the mysterious photographer Sean O’Connell. When the magazine wants to use one of Sean’s photographs for the last issue, Walter realizes he lost it and goes in search of Sean. Along the way, he breaks out of his shell, becomes more confident, and starts to turn is day dreams into reality. It’s a story most people can relate too! The breathtaking scenes they shoot around the world only add to the incredible story.

The Way
old man hiking in the way
Someone who knows me well told me to watch it and, when I did, I was blown away. It was such an emotional movie. I cried a bit. The Way follows Tom, an American doctor who travels to France to pick up the ashes of his dead son. His son died on the Camino and he walks it to finish what his son started. Along the way, he makes friends with some other pilgrims and begins to see why his son loved travelings so much. Martin Sheen is incredible in this film and the movie totally made me decide to hike the Camino this year.

Vicky Cristina Barcelona
Scarlet Johansson lounging in European backyard in Vicky Cristina Barcelona
Another Woody Allen movie, this movie follow two girlfriends on a summer holiday in Spain become enamored with the same painter as they spend a holiday in Barcelona. When his crazy ex comes onto the scene all hell breaks loose. This movie not only tells an amazing story, but shows off the beauty, excitement, and magic of Barcelona (Woody Allen, what’s with you getting places right?).

Y Tu Mama Tambien
Main characters splashing in the ocean in y tu mama tambien film
Set in Mexico, this movie follows two teenage boys and an attractive older woman embark on a road trip and learn a thing or two about life, friendship, and each other. This movie won countless awards and helped make Gael Garcia Bernal a star.

Wild
Reese Witherspoon solo hiking on a train in Wild film
Based on the novel of the same name, this movie follows Cheryl Strayed has she hikes the Pacific Crest Trail as a way to restart her life, end her drug addiction, and finally cope with the death of her mother. While I loved the book more (I mean the book is always better), I thought Reese Witherspoon gave a really strong performance and the movie still conveys the emotional impact of the book.

Before Sunrise
love scene between two backpackers in Before Sunrise trilogy
This classic Gen X movies about a young man and the woman he meets on a train in Europe, says a lot about the shortness of travel relationships. They only have one night together but it seems to stretch on forever. I like this movie because it plays with that sense of “travel time.” On the road, days feel like months and, when you meet someone special, one day can feel like a lifetime.

A Map for Saturday
a map for saturday documentary logo
With this movie, I save the best for last. This documentary follows Brook Silva Braga as he prepares for his year long trip around the world. He films the entire trip and it is the best – THE BEST – movie about long term travel. It captures the anxiety before your trip, the worry of your friends and family, the ups and downs, the fleeting romances, deep friendships, and stresses of the road like no other movie ever has. Out of all the movies on this list, watch this movie. I did an interview with Brook many, many years ago. Seriously, this is my favorite travel movie. I watched it the day before I came home and “settled” down in NYC and it stirred a lot of emotions.

There are many travel movies out there – most of them horrible – but out of the countless movies I’ve seen, these are my favorite. What’s yours?

P.S. – Last week, I released a new version of my blogging course with more comprehensive information, screen shots, examples, new webinars, expert interviews, video tutorials, and case studies. If you’re a blogger and interested in taking your blog to the next level, come check it out!

P.P.S – We’re hosting our next book club meeting on Feb. 6th! We’ll be discussing David Grann’s PHENOMENAL book The Lost City of Z. Come join us and talk travel and trekking in the Amazon!

Photos: 1, 2, 34, 5,  6, 78, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19,  20,  21,  22,  23,  24,  25,  26,  27,  28

The post My (Current) Ultimate List of Travel Movies appeared first on Nomadic Matt’s Travel Site.


My (Current) Ultimate List of Travel Movies

If you need a bangkok airport transfer
look no further bangkokairportlimo.com offers the most reliable, competitive deals (all rates are inclusive of tolls).

Travel Better, Cheaper, Longer

Bangkok Airport Hotel 3 of the most popular Bangkok Airport Hotels – great deals, all hotels within 10 minutes of the airport terminal, 24 hour reception and transfer service – instant confirmation and secure payment.

GD Star Rating
loading...
GD Star Rating
loading...